An Inside Look At Pat Moorer & The Pit

Posted on Sep 26 2012 - 9:02am by Brent Lepping

 

We typically try not to dedicate an entire post to something from another local site, but it’s raining outside today and I’m feeling real lazy. But perhaps more important than the fact that’s it’s raining and I’m lazy, is the superb insight provided by CL Brown and the Courier Journal on this great piece that examines life in The Pit and the man behind it all, Pat Moorer. I first got a glimpse of life in the pit earlier this summer when UofL held their two open practices. When the team took the field, we noticed that cornerback Jordan Paschal was on crutches. Minutes later we looked over to our left and saw him sitting in what appeared to be a ditch, shovel in hand. He literally spent 60 minutes sitting in the blazing hot sun digging in that ditch. The upper-body torment must have been excruciating. And that’s what Moorer does. To promote an atmosphere where guys won’t milk their injuries to stay out of practice, he’s devised a workout / torture regiment for injured players that ensures they are back at practice the first day they’re physically able to do so. If you’ve hurt your knee or ankle, get ready for an explosive day of upper body work (see Jordan Paschal). Conversely, if it’s your arm or shoulder, prepare for a grueling lower-body workout. But, as the Courier’s article shows, it’s not just digging ditches and pulling golf carts. Moorer also wares down his players in the weight room, too. We’ve often heard the stories and myths behind Moorer’s commanding presence, and after seeing this piece, it’s probably safe to say they were all true.

No one volunteers for two days in The Pit, the figurative place where injured Cardinals go while their teammates practice.

“A lot of places, injured players don’t do anything in practice; they get to stand back and watch practice,” strength and conditioning coach Pat Moorer said. “Here, on the other hand, we have The Pit.”

The Pit is a workout regimen designed by Moorer and his staff to keep players mentally and physically sharp — and to weed out those who might try to milk an injury to avoid practice. They take the injury into account, so if a player has, say, a lower body injury, he works his upper body in The Pit.

However the coaches tailor it, the player is going to work.

“What an injured player has to realize is when he’s injured, it’s no day off for him,” said head coach Charlie Strong, who wants The Pit to be so demanding that injured players clamor to return to practice.
Here’s where The Pit really does its job. Anybody — at least any U of L player — can make it through one day of The Pit. Knowing a second day of a grueling, no-rest workout awaits brings an added appreciation for practice.

Here’s where The Pit really does its job. Anybody — at least any U of L player — can make it through one day of The Pit. Knowing a second day of a grueling, no-rest workout awaits brings an added appreciation for practice.

“That’s his motivation,” center Mario Benavides said. “He wants to make The Pit harder than practice so maybe those guys that aren’t as hurt as they act like would probably want to go back to practice faster.”

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